Something that I think we already know

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Dark Knight
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Something that I think we already know

Post by Dark Knight » Fri May 22, 2020 7:21 pm

Something that I think we already know but a useful reference for those who come after us.
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Re: Something that I think we already know

Post by Asgard » Fri May 22, 2020 7:49 pm

These things seem instinctive to us that took that path but like you imply some of these basic skills are disappearing in the west.
One that I seemed to aquire the knack of early on and still frequently employ is use of various files, almost any form can be reasonably accurately produced by hand it just takes time both to learn and apply

Maybe we will go back to understanding the importance of actually making stuff instead of inventing procedures and rules to keep office types in employment

It now takes 20+ years for a frontline fighter jet to go from drawing board to production in the west

BUT....Its telling that in the current crisis we are managing to produce in short order new CPAP machines and ramp up production of vital equipment by simply bypassing lots of the useless crap that the bureaucrats seem to think is important.
So we do still have skilled people around, they just need to be allowed to create.
What use is being well adjusted to a sick society?.

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Re: Something that I think we already know

Post by phil_h » Fri May 22, 2020 9:09 pm

Dark Knight wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 7:21 pm
Something that I think we already know but a useful reference for those who come after us.
Cor that made me very nostalgic ! I was reliving all my metalwork and woodwork classes :) I ended up doing engineering and possibly have more different types of sawblade than are good for any one person :lol: I even get annoyed when I cant buy a proper crosscut wood saw :roll:
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Re: Something that I think we already know

Post by fatowl » Sat May 23, 2020 9:12 am

I loved the language. Very precise, and correct. How refreshing.

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Re: Something that I think we already know

Post by bowber » Sat May 23, 2020 11:21 am

Being a practical person who grew up with a dad who made almost everything, I then became an engineer and spent many years as an apprentice so that is all normal to me, along with setting the height of your vice correctly, and hand filing (and the using the correct file) all learnt while on the job and at college, along with learning to use various machine tools.
My youngest son went to college recently and did a full time OND course which had very little practical work, and much of that was watching the tutor use a cnc machine centre, not a single hand made piece in his whole year at college. I know industry has moved more towards cnc machine tools but hand skills are still very relevant in maintenance work and small engineering shops.
A friend of mine is still an engineer and now a shop foreman and he said they wouldn't be interested in someone who had already been to college, they'd rather get someone fresh from school and teach them their way than get someone who thought they already know everything but haven't used a manual lathe or milling machine yet.

Steve

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Re: Something that I think we already know

Post by phil_h » Sat May 23, 2020 1:54 pm

Apprenticeships and qualifications that have real work as part of the course ie day-release and sandwich courses.
I think most professions and trades would benefit from that approach.
Keeping someone stuck in a classroom all the time just keeps them thinking like kids.
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Re: Something that I think we already know

Post by Dark Knight » Sat May 23, 2020 6:43 pm

Something along the same lines.
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Re: Something that I think we already know

Post by lancashirelad » Sat May 23, 2020 7:20 pm

Back when I was working full time i interviewed for apprentices, some of who were 27 years old, I’d been used to apprentices being 15/16yrs, you very rarely hear anyone wanting a trade these days, I was plagued by the guys I served my time with cos joinery apprenticeships had been reduced from 7yrs to 5yrs before I started, now if you can get one it’s 3yrs. :D
I've to start again now buying & fitting all the bits I had on the previous cb500x!!! :D

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Re: Something that I think we already know

Post by Flipflop » Sun May 24, 2020 12:41 pm

Lack of practical skills in the general population is a very British thing IMHO. I believe that it stems from the class system and the trades are generally looked down upon.
I have French, German and Dutch friends and whatever their jobs are they are all very practical.
I built a large garden wall for a German guy once, he was a teacher and laboured for me as it was the summer holidays. We incorporated some wrought iron work that he’d rescued from a skip. He was a very practical man and said that in Germany most people are capable of doing basic building work but obviously trades are much quicker. It means that no one gets ripped off or has to put up with shoddy workmanship.
I grew up in an Irish household and my mum taught me to sow, knit and iron - I also started cooking at the age of 12. I would struggle to remember how to knit but I can still sew a button on.
If I tell English people this they are generally gobsmacked.
A German friends son is an architect but he is also a qualified carpenter - as part of his 6 years of study - and has built his own house. A lot of architects I’ve met in this country are designers/artists and not practical - their buildings look nice but it’s the trades that have to sort out the practicalities of the drawings.
I’m not slagging here, it’s just observation.
Anyway, Amazon have just delivered my new shovel (true) so I’m excited to open the box :P

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Re: Something that I think we already know

Post by Dark Knight » Sun May 24, 2020 6:50 pm

Not sure if people are born with some sort of predisposition for doing certain things.
When I was young i used to build those plastic airfix kits and progressed onto balsa wood models with engines.
Then progressed onto Amateur radio (I have a licence), next was push bikes, we used to go on 40 mile runs at night just for something to do.
One day my mate said to me lets get motorbikes, so I bought a Tiger cub and he a C15, we then progressed up to an AJS 31CSR and my mate had a 500 cc Manx norton.
I used to end up rebuilding the engines on the bikes, finally realized what was wrong when I had my mini Couper, it had a oill pressure gauge and when driving fast the oil pressure would drop as it was getting too hot, fitted an oil cooler, problem solved, but too late for the bikes.
When I was riding motorbikes there were no speed limils outside town, so you just rode to the road conditions, which was sometimes 100 MPH.
I remember we used to race some guys in their Triumph spitfires, who for some reason always seemed to have a blond girl in the passenger seat.
I became an Electrical/Electronic engineer and worked in the Avionics sector, but these days am usually fiddling about with mechanical things.

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