TomBoyNI's Challenge...

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TomBoyNI's Challenge...

Post by TomBoyNI » Wed May 25, 2016 12:40 am

So here we go, it'll probably just be the Irish Castles for me, but who knows...
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Re: TomBoyNI's Challenge...

Post by TomBoyNI » Wed May 25, 2016 12:57 am

Enniskillen Castle

Enniskillen Castle is situated in Enniskillen, County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. It was originally built in the 16th century and now houses the Fermanagh County Museum and the regimental museum of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers and the 5th Royal Inniskilling Dragoon Guards.

The first Enniskillen castle was built on this site by Hugh Maguire in the 16th century.[1] It featured greatly in Irish rebellions against English rule in the 16th century and was taken after an eight day siege in 1594. In 1607 it was remodelled and refurbished by Captain William Cole. The riverside tower at the south, known as the Watergate, was added at this time. In the 18th century the castle was remodelled as the Castle Barracks.

The Castle provided the main defence for the west end of the town and guarded the Sligo road. It consists of two sections, a central tower keep and a curtain wall which was strengthened with small turrets called Bartizans. [1] The design of the castle has strong Scottish influences. This can be particularly seen in the Watergate, which features two corbelled circular tourelles which were probably built about 1609.[2] Since then it has been substantially rebuilt. It is a State Care Historic Monument.[1]

Thanks Wikipedia (thumbs)

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Re: TomBoyNI's Challenge...

Post by Flintlock » Wed May 25, 2016 6:23 am

Looks like you had a nice day for your trip to Enniskillen. A nice castle & the museum there is well worth a visit.

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Re: TomBoyNI's Challenge...

Post by TomBoyNI » Thu May 26, 2016 12:12 pm

Ballinafad Castle :

Ballinafad Castle is located in Sligo County in the Republic of Ireland. It can be found on the east side of highway N4 overlooking Lough Arrow at the town of Ballinafad.

The castle is in ruins and is accessible year round. There are no tours, guides, or fees. Visitors can park in a small lot at the foot of the hill where they will find an interpretive sign.

To enter the castle grounds, walk up the path and through the small iron gate. The castle is an Elizabethan blockhouse built during the Nine Years' War by Captain John St. Barbe on land granted to him by James I. The castle was garrisoned by ten men and commanded by John St. Barbe. It was partially destroyed by Red Hugh O’Donnel in 1595. The castle was again sacked in 1642 and fell out of use by 1680.

Visitors cannot enter the castle, but the interior is visible through breaches in the walls that are closed off by iron fences.

Thanks Wikipedia (thumbs)

Unfortunately when I stopped by it was undergoing maintenance :pinch:

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Re: TomBoyNI's Challenge...

Post by TomBoyNI » Tue Jun 07, 2016 2:16 pm

Tullynally Castle, County Westmeath, Ireland :

Tullynally Castle is a country house (also known as Pakenham Hall Castle) situated some 2 km from Castlepollard on the Coole village road in County Westmeath, Ireland. The gothic style building has over 120 rooms and has been home to the Pakenham family (now the Earls of Longford) for over 350 years, except for 32 years in the early 19th century when it belonged to the Ryder family.

The house is surrounded by twelve acres of park land and gardens, including woodland gardens and walled gardens laid out in the early 19th century with a limestone grotto and ornamental lakes. In the 21st century a Chinese garden with a pagoda and a Tibetan garden of waterfalls and streams have been added.[1]

The site entrance from the public road is situated 1.5 km outside Castlepollard on the Granard road 20 km from Mullingar, 80 km from Dublin via the N4 or N3 roads. The grounds are open to the public.

In 1665 Henry Pakenham, a captain in the Parliamentary Dragoons, was granted land in lieu of pay arrears that included Tullynally. His grandson Thomas was made first Baron Longford in 1756. Thomas's grandson, another Thomas and 3rd Baron Longford, also inherited the superior title of 2nd Earl of Longford in 1794 from his grandmother, the Countess of Longford.

The 2nd Earl remodelled the 17th-century house in the gothic revival style in the early 1800s, adding towers and a moat. It was by then larger than any other castellated house in Ireland. Since then, the house has passed down through successive generations of Pakenhams to the present earl, Thomas Pakenham, 8th Earl of Longford, and is the largest house in private hands in Ireland.[2]

The British Army general, Sir Edward Pakenham, GCB, was born and brought up in the house.

Thanks Wikipedia

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Re: TomBoyNI's Challenge...

Post by TomBoyNI » Wed Jun 08, 2016 1:31 pm

Peel Castle : Peel, Isle of Man (Not Officially in the List, but Officially on Mine (thumbs) )

Peel Castle (Cashtal Purt-ny-Hinshey in Manx Gaelic) is a castle in Peel on the Isle of Man, originally constructed by Vikings. The castle stands on St Patrick's Isle which is connected to the town by a causeway. It is now owned by Manx National Heritage and is open to visitors during the summer.

The castle was built in the 11th century by the Vikings, under the rule of King Magnus Barefoot. While there were older stone Celtic monastic buildings on the island, the first Viking fortifications were built of wood. The prominent round tower was originally part of the Celtic monastery, but has had battlements added at a later date. In the early 14th century, the majority of the walls and towers were built primarily from local red sandstone, which is found abundantly in the area. After the rule of the Vikings, the castle continued to be used by the Church due to the cathedral built there – the see of the diocese of Sodor and Man – but was eventually abandoned in the 18th century.

The castle remained fortified, and new defensive positions were added as late as 1860. The buildings within the castle are now mostly ruined, but the outer walls remain intact. Excavations in 1982-87 revealed an extensive graveyard as well as the remains of Magnus Barefoot's original wooden fort. The most spectacular finds were the 10th century grave of "The Pagan Lady" which included a fine example of a Viking necklace and a cache of silver coins dating from about 1030. The Castle's most famous "resident" is the so-called Moddey Dhoo or "Black Dog" ghost.

Peel Castle features today on the reverse side of the £10 notes issued by the Isle of Man Government.[1]

Peel Castle may occasionally be confused with Piel Castle, located on Piel Island, around 30 miles to the east in the Irish Sea. This particularly occurs in reference to the William Wordsworth poem describing Piel, spelling its name as 'Peele': especially as Wordsworth is documented as having visited Peel Castle, and wrote several times about the Isle of Man.[2]

Peel Castle has been proposed as a possible location of the Arthurian Avalon.[3]

Thanks Wikipedia

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Re: TomBoyNI's Challenge...

Post by Heff » Wed Jun 08, 2016 1:46 pm

Nice one TomBoy (thumbs)
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I'm probably out on the Bat Bike



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Re: TomBoyNI's Challenge...

Post by Flintlock » Wed Jun 08, 2016 10:44 pm

Looks like you are clocking up the castles & miles Tomboy- can feel a big miles day coming on myself very soon (thumbs)

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Re: TomBoyNI's Challenge...

Post by TomBoyNI » Tue Jul 19, 2016 8:26 pm

Trim Castle, County Meath, Ireland :

Trim Castle (Irish: Caisleán Bhaile Atha Troim) is a Norman castle on the south bank of the River Boyne in Trim, County Meath, Ireland. With an area of 30,000 m², it is the largest Norman castle in Ireland.[1][2] Over a period of 30 years, it was built by Hugh de Lacy and his son Walter as the caput of the Lordship of Meath.

The Castle was used as a centre of Norman administration for the Lordship of Meath, one of the new administrative areas of Ireland created by King Henry II of England. Hugh de Lacy took possession of it in 1172. De Lacy built a huge ringwork castle defended by a stout double palisade and external ditch on top of the hill. There may also have been further defences around the cliffs fringing the high ground. Part of a stone footed timber gatehouse lies beneath the present stone gate at the west side of the castle. De Lacy left Ireland entrusting the castle to Hugh Tyrrel, baron of Castleknock, one of his chief lieutenants. The ringwork was attacked and burnt by forces of the Gaelic High King of Ireland, Ruaidrí Ua Conchobair; Tyrrel, having appealed in vain for help, was forced to flee. Ua Conchobair soon withdrew and De Lacy immediately rebuilt the castle in 1173. His son Walter continued rebuilding and the castle was completed c. 1224. The next phase of the castle's development took place at the end of the 13th century and the beginning of the 14th century; a new great hall (with undercroft and attached solar in a radically altered curtain tower), a new forebuilding, and stables were added to the keep. On Walter's death in 1241 his granddaughter Mathilda ('Maud') inherited the castle. Her second husband was Geoffrey de Geneville, Lord of Vaucouleurs in France. Mathilda died in 1304, and Geoffrey entered the priory at St. Mary's in Trim. His son had died in 1292 and the estate passed to his oldest daughter, Joan. In 1301, Joan married Roger Mortimer and the castle passed to the Mortimer family who held it until 1425, when the line died out.[3] The estate passed to the next heir in the female line, Richard of York, who was killed at the Battle of Wakefield in 1460. In 1461, Richard's son, Edward IV, appointed Germyn Lynch of London to be his representative at Trim.


The inside of one of the towers of Trim Castle.
The castle site was chosen because it is on raised ground, overlooking a fording point on the River Boyne. The area was an important early medieval ecclesiastical and royal site that was navigable in medieval times by boat up the River Boyne, about 25 miles from the Irish Sea. Trim Castle is referred to in the Norman poem "The Song of Dermot and the Earl".

During the late Middle Ages, Trim Castle was the centre of administration for Meath and marked the outer northern boundary of The Pale. In the 16th and 17th centuries it had declined in importance, except as a potentially important military site, and the castle was allowed to deteriorate. During the 15th century the Irish Parliament met in Trim Castle seven times and a mint operated in the castle.

The Castle fell into decline in the 16th century but was refortified during the Irish Confederate Wars in the 1640s. In 1649 after the sacking of Drogheda, the garrison of Trim fled to join other Irish forces and the place was occupied by the army of Oliver Cromwell.

After the wars of the 1680s, the castle was granted to the Wellesley family who held it until Arthur Wellesley (the Duke of Wellington), sold it to the Leslies. In following years it passed via the Encumbered Estates Court into the hands of the Dunsany Plunketts. They left the lands open and from time to time allowed various uses, with part of the Castle Field rented for some years by the Town Council as a municipal dump, and a small meeting hall for the Royal British Legion erected. The Dunsanys held the Castle and surrounds until 1993, when after years of discussion, Lord Dunsany sold the land and buildings to the State, retaining only river access and fishing rights.

The Office of Public Works began a major programme of exploratory works and conservation, costing over six million euro, including partial restoration of the moat and the installation of a protective roof. The castle was re-opened to the public in 2000.

Thanks Wikipedia

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Re: TomBoyNI's Challenge...

Post by 92kk k100lt 193214 » Wed Jul 20, 2016 11:34 am

Some lovely shots there and good history.

Trim Castle was also used as the setting for Braveheart.

So where is your next one?

I could add a few:

Mallow Castle, Co. Cork.
Birr Castle. Co. Offaly.
Charles Fort in Kinsale, Co. Cork.
Dun Guaire Castle in Kinvara Co. Clare.

Enough to keep you wandering the country for months.
1992 K100LT 110,000 miles
1984 K100RT 36,000 miles now going on 90,000 miles.
1997 K1100LT SE 59,000 miles now 84,600 miles
1983 K100RS 29,000 miles

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