Top 10 Yamahas - Visordown

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djl50
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Joined: Mon Dec 23, 2013 2:01 pm

Top 10 Yamahas - Visordown

Post by djl50 » Wed Jan 15, 2014 3:31 pm

Here are your top 10 Yamahas, as voted for by you! We've taken all the Yammies from our huge database with 5 reviews or more, then averaged out owners' detailed ratings on the engine, brakes, handling, comfort and build to arrive at a final score. The higher the score, the more highly rated the bike. Remember, this list is based on owner's reviews.

Posted: 15 January 2014
by Visordown


10. XJR1300 (1999-present): 4.21/5

The Suzuki GSX1400's main rival in the retro bike stakes, this big Yamaha is another bang-for-the-buck naked. It's not as fast or powerful as you'd expect with only 105hp but it'll still embarrass sports cars at the lights, so there. However, the 1251cc inline-four (like the GSX, dating back to the '80s in lineage) is a wellspring of torque, 80lbft to be precise, pulling effortlessly from jogging pace and hitting 140mph if you so demand. Besides the point-and squirt-giggles, the XJR's charm lies primarily in its perfect bygone-era looks.


9. TDM900 (2002-2011): 4.26/5

Yamaha listened and have replaced the TDM's old gearbox with a slicker six-speed unit. Mated to its nice and mellow 897cc parallel-twin that pushes out 76hp and 60ftlb of torque, the smooth power delivery makes it easy to stroke the bike along at decent pace until it runs out of fuel, which will happen after around 160 miles. The brakes - borrowed from the R1 - are sportier than the rest of the package, so firm up the suspension if you plan on going for a spirited ride.


8. YZF-R1 (2004-2006): 4.29/5

The performance figures of the '04 R1 speak volumes. At 180hp, it has 10 more than the ’02 bike, records a faster standing quarter and has a 7mph higher top speed. Similar to a Ducati 848, the Y-pipe holds the cat under the seat, and as a result the seat becomes somewhat of an AGA oven in slow moving traffic. Ground clearance is also an issue on track due to the R1's low pegs, Rearsets and a decat exhaust will solve these minor issues however. This model regained some of the bite that made the R1 family such modern classics in their day. 



7. YZF-R1 (2007-2008): 4.31/5

The 2008 R1 is pre-big-bang. It was launched at a time when bikes like the new Honda Fireblade and KTM RC8 were getting more press, and didn't get a great deal of love. However that all plays to your advantage when it comes to second-hand price. It's still a fantastic bike, very quick and many would say prettier than the slightly chubbier modern R1s, which retail for over £12,000.


6. FZ1 (2006-present): 4.38/5

Take a re-tuned R1 motor and shoehorn it into a naked chassis and hey presto! This is what dreams are made of, right? Erm, no. The FZ1 is a really good bike - much like its older brother the Fazer - but it lacks any grunt both low-down and in the mid-range, which is exactly what you want in a naked bike. However, the fact that most owners' biggest gripes are the hard seat and awkward side-stand suggests they're happy with everything else.


=4. XP500 T-MAX (2000-2011): 4.4/5

Yamaha's T-MAX is the machine that invented the Maxi scooter class in 2001. The class-leading bike is sporty and handles like a proper motorcycle, with the convenience of a scooter. Luggage carrying capacity could be improved, especially when you consider that they cost a salty £8,699 new!


=4. FZS600 Fazer (1998-2003): 4.4/5

Using a Thundercat derived engine, the Fazer has a perfectly-carburated rush to its 12,500rpm redline, where it puts out a chirpy 95hp. Although the Fazer has budget suspension and aesthetic that divide opinion, it's so much more than the sum of it's parts. Their popularity demonstrates how capable they are as an all-rounder, and they offer an interesting alternative to the Hornet, Bandit and SV650 clan.


3. XT660Z Tenere (2008-present): 4.5/5

Using a motor borrowed from Yamaha's XT660R trail bike, the Tenere has a simple but bulletproof engine. It's comfortable, has the adventure bike looks sorted, and those twin underseat exhausts pop nicely on deceleration. The original XT600Z Tenere, launched in 1983 and popular with desert racers, was a direct relative of the XT500 that had won two Paris-Dakar rallies. It had a 30-litre tank, huge front suspension travel and weighed 45kg less than the current generation Tenere, which scales in at 183kg dry.


2. YZF-R125 (2008-present): 4.63/5

The R125 was the UK's fifth top seller from January to September in 2013, showing just how popular these bikes are. The single-cylinder engine chucks out 15hp and the bike has a wheelbase only 25mm shorter than the R6. It handles well, it's frugal and it's easily the best-looking 125 sportsbike on the market. If ever there were a bike to act out youthful fantasies of MotoGP stardom on, this is it.


1. Super Tenere XT1200Z (2010-present): 4.83/5

Built to rival BMW's GS and Ducati's Multistrada, it's clear that Yamaha wanted a slice of the adventure bike pie. The 1199cc twin puts out 109hp and 84ftlb of torque, managing an acceptable 42mpg. Could be worse when you consider the Super Tenere's hefty 261kg weight. It's extremely well-built and at £11,999, is £600 less than the GS. You may not get the BMW badge or the extensive options list, but Japanese reliability and peace of mind is a big 'yes please' when it comes to adventure bikes.


Owners reviews so a poll this is worth the paper it is written on.

Dave

Adventure Bike Rider New Issue Out Now
Zookman
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Re: Top 10 Yamahas - Visordown

Post by Zookman » Wed Jan 15, 2014 5:42 pm

The 42 MPG for the S10 is crap.... the bike is renowned for easily getting well over 50.

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Re: Top 10 Yamahas - Visordown

Post by bond_yzf » Wed Jan 15, 2014 5:57 pm

For you may be doesn't mean to say everyone rides like a grandad

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Re: Top 10 Yamahas - Visordown

Post by Zookman » Wed Jan 15, 2014 6:00 pm

Well virtually everyone reports good MPG from this bike. On here and other forums.

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Re: Top 10 Yamahas - Visordown

Post by bond_yzf » Wed Jan 15, 2014 6:03 pm

I'd say 42 from a 1200 was good

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Re: Top 10 Yamahas - Visordown

Post by Zookman » Wed Jan 15, 2014 6:07 pm

bond_yzf wrote:I'd say 42 from a 1200 was good
Well it isn't.... I'd never have bought it if the MPG was that low.

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Re: Top 10 Yamahas - Visordown

Post by bond_yzf » Wed Jan 15, 2014 6:09 pm

Well as you say it's not It obviously can't be





You should try riding a xjr1300

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Re: Top 10 Yamahas - Visordown

Post by Zookman » Wed Jan 15, 2014 6:13 pm

bond_yzf wrote:Well as you say it's not It obviously can't be





You should try riding a xjr1300
Well, its a naked musclebike. Not really the sort of bike people buy if they care about MPG.

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Re: Top 10 Yamahas - Visordown

Post by bond_yzf » Wed Jan 15, 2014 6:24 pm

And your quibbling between 42-50mpg

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Re: Top 10 Yamahas - Visordown

Post by Zookman » Wed Jan 15, 2014 6:27 pm

bond_yzf wrote:And your quibbling between 42-50mpg
53 average.... bit less in winter bit more in summer.

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