Yamaha XT660Z Téneré Clutch Disc Replacement.

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WIBO
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Yamaha XT660Z Téneré Clutch Disc Replacement.

Post by WIBO » Tue May 28, 2019 3:59 pm

After 105,000kms it was time to replace my clutch discs as I was starting to experience my clutch slipping under heavy acceleration, coupled with more of a clunk when selecting first gear.


I ordered an EBC heavy duty clutch along with heavy duty clutch springs.

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Soak the fibrous friction plate discs in clean moto engine oil ........

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The clutch lives in behind this engine casing.

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Clean any dirt off the clutch cover where it meets the engine. A 10mm socket is needed to remove all of the bolts holding same to engine. Loosen each bolt 1/4 of a turn at a time, in stages and in a crisscross pattern. After all of the bolts are fully loosened, remove them. This will assist to prevent the mating faces of the clutch cover from warping minutely.

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Put the bike on its side or lean over against a wall so once you take the clutch cover off there'll be no engine oil leaking out.


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Loosen off clutch cable at the handlebar and remove from the lever. Use this opportunity to take off and check the lever pivot hole and pivot bolt for wear and tear; In this case my lever hole was extensively oval. New lever ordered.


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Take off the other end of the cable from the clutch actuation lever splined arm. With circlip pliers take off the clip gently and wiggle off the splined arm. Note the position of the spring and how it works and fits.

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Remove the clutch cover casing slowly taking care to ease it away from the engine to avoid the gasket tearing. A new gasket could be thought about if need be and to have in reserve.

Note that one lining-up cylindrical dowel stayed in the engine and the other came with the casing. Hold any with your finger as they could drop out and fall into the engine.

You will be faced with this...your clutch lives under a 'lid ' (pressure plate ) as it were.

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Take off the five bolts as shown along with the springs that they hold...these are your clutch springs. Put the bike in first gear so there's a bit of resistance to help.

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Keep them clean and stash them in a clean container.

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Wiggle easily and remove the clutch 'lid'.... a clutch disc might just come off with it. If you're replacing your clutch fibrous discs with Yamaha ones keep and eye on the order you'll be removing them and replace like for like as there are different ones.The EBC discs are all the same so you don't need to worry.


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There'll be fibrous discs and metal discs. I use a magnet and a small screwdriver to squeeze against the edges to lift the metal ones out.

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The very last fibrous disc will be thinner width ways than the others as this is to allow a pressure ring to fit...it will be marked 'outside' so you know what way to put it back in.


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The centre spigot ( metal pin/bar called a pull bar ) you see is free to move Check how it works. You'll see teeth in it where the clutch actuating bar meshes into it. When this bar turns it'll move this spigot. A bit like rack and pinion steering. The amount it moves is enough to pull the clutch plates off each other to disengage drive. Check the bearing you can see in the centre for any wear. Mine showed no play.

Note.....The alloy turrets where the clutch springs bolts are only alloy....if you over tighten later in the reassembly process they will break off at the base and you'll need a new expensive clutch basket

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Lift your clutch discs out and put them in in the same order relative to the metal clutch discs that you took out. Put the clutch 'lid' back on and fit the new springs with the bolts. When my original springs were measured they were within half of the official tolerance . For 13 quid more it's a no brainer for me.

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As you tighten them down make sure the springs are evenly on the bolt head.





You can see the spring here.......


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Tighten so that it is even....


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This is a steel bolt going into alloy......so when it is nipped up just tighten an eighth of a turn more and leave well alone. Remember the alloy turret explanation from before?

10NM is the torque wrench setting but I've seen this figure strip threads before.

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Ready for the next step.

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Check that the spigot ( pull bar ) teeth are facing the rear of the moto and are in the same angle and line up position with the clutch actuating bar and slide the cover on so the each ones teeth fit.


Use the two dowels in the engine casing to help you line the cover up nicely. If it has meshed correctly it'll be a smooth operation...if there's resistance then the spigot is not meshing with the bar....tale off and realign.

Once this is flush and fitted then coat the bolts with copper grease and finger tighten the engine to start them on the correct thread and to avoid cross threading of same.


Tighten up each diagonally opposite each other to avoid warping the mating surfaces of the clutch cover and engine casing. Again, when nipped up and showing resistance tighten a further eighth of a turn and leave well alone. Soft alloy grips hard steel without being too tight.

There's a punch mark on the clutch cover and the actuating arm....line these two up....wiggle the arm one spline at a time until they match.


Screwdriver tip shows mark

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Mount the clutch cable at the casing and then reconnect it at the handlebar. You can check the adjustment figures with the workshop manual and start there to see what way you need to adjust as a benchmark for feel and bite relative to your personal preferences.


Once test ridden there was indeed no clutch slip under heavy acceleration along with only a slight clunk going into first gear.


Drink beer.
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Last edited by WIBO on Tue May 28, 2019 6:59 pm, edited 14 times in total.
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Re: Yamaha XT660Z Téneré Clutch Disc Replacement.

Post by Tramp » Tue May 28, 2019 5:25 pm

Ace stuff your a saint in my books 8-) :D

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Re: Yamaha XT660Z Téneré Clutch Disc Replacement.

Post by chunky butt » Tue May 28, 2019 5:38 pm

Proper good stuff keith, ;) cheers for posting.

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Re: Yamaha XT660Z Téneré Clutch Disc Replacement.

Post by daveuprite » Tue May 28, 2019 5:57 pm

That's a good straightforward explanation. Actually clutch change is one of those jobs I don't mind doing. Just keep it slow and methodical, and don't talk to anyone or allow any interruptions while you are replacing the discs in order.

Also, full marks for your thumb, which looks just like mine after most visits to the workshop... :D

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Re: Yamaha XT660Z Téneré Clutch Disc Replacement.

Post by Dark Knight » Tue May 28, 2019 8:26 pm

Really brilliant write up, maybe you should consider taking over from John Haynes who sadly is no longer with us.

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