The mythical low maintenance trail bike.

Got a spanner in the works? Post your motorcycle problems here.
ChasF
Posts: 672
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 12:23 pm
Been thanked: 1 time

Re: The mythical lowmaintenance trail bike.

Post by ChasF » Mon Jul 03, 2017 8:55 pm

Thanks for the comments. I'm not unrealistic about the level of maintenance required, nor am I trying to cut corners/save money. I use waterproof grease and 2rs bearings. The point I was making though was that the extra maintenance required on cmpetition orientated enduro bikes (EXCs) is relatively insignificant compared to the general mantenance that all trail bikes need especially if used in mud and water.

Adventure Bike Rider New Issue Out Now
micksea
Posts: 1024
Joined: Wed Oct 24, 2012 9:18 pm
Has thanked: 25 times
Been thanked: 57 times

Re: The mythical lowmaintenance trail bike.

Post by micksea » Mon Jul 03, 2017 9:08 pm

Some competition bikes use extra seals and usually better spec parts,hence the higher price.a lot of trail bikes are just road bikes with longer suspension and semi knobbly tyres.

BlueUK
Posts: 52
Joined: Wed Jun 28, 2017 5:08 pm

Re: The mythical lowmaintenance trail bike.

Post by BlueUK » Mon Jul 03, 2017 9:32 pm

ChasF wrote:Thanks for the comments. I'm not unrealistic about the level of maintenance required, nor am I trying to cut corners/save money. I use waterproof grease and 2rs bearings. The point I was making though was that the extra maintenance required on cmpetition orientated enduro bikes (EXCs) is relatively insignificant compared to the general mantenance that all trail bikes need especially if used in mud and water.
I don't bother going out on the local lanes to me as it's muddy rutts. I don't mind riding them but it hammers the consumables to the point that brake pads can be ruined in one ride, Instead I only ride further afield such as Wales, Peak District,N Yorks, etc where it's mostly rock climbs.

User avatar
garyboy
Posts: 2320
Joined: Thu Mar 07, 2013 6:14 pm
Location: Pontypridd
Has thanked: 866 times
Been thanked: 351 times

Re: The mythical lowmaintenance trail bike.

Post by garyboy » Mon Jul 03, 2017 11:32 pm

I would have thought that a smaller lighter bike was less wearing.
My old TTR600 was great but seemed to fall apart gradually.
My CRF250L has not even been washed yet, and going well ... tho not had much use, admittedly.
more weight = more stress (machine and man)

SteveW
Posts: 3809
Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2011 2:13 pm
Has thanked: 184 times
Been thanked: 176 times

Re: The mythical lowmaintenance trail bike.

Post by SteveW » Tue Jul 04, 2017 6:31 am

I find gently rolling or pushing the bike onto an unpaved surface, then taking a photo to give the illusion of off road use, will greatly increase the life of most components.
Here's one I'm particularly proud of.....eight yards from the A59 near Clitheroe.
IMG_0764.JPG
IMG_0764.JPG (110.14 KiB) Viewed 210 times

User avatar
chunky butt
Posts: 1487
Joined: Thu Nov 13, 2014 10:39 pm
Has thanked: 48 times
Been thanked: 440 times

Re: The mythical lowmaintenance trail bike.

Post by chunky butt » Tue Jul 04, 2017 6:43 am

25k...I would say that's pretty good service wise, anyways I don't mind doing the serviceing bit, I think it goes hand in hand, and I quite enjoy it. Steve

catcitrus
Posts: 1545
Joined: Sat Nov 09, 2013 5:36 pm
Has thanked: 16 times
Been thanked: 167 times

Re: The mythical lowmaintenance trail bike.

Post by catcitrus » Tue Jul 04, 2017 9:33 am

I've owned quite a few offroad bikes over the years--and do jet wash--carefully. I check the rising rate once a year (pull it apart and regrease)--also the SA, I make sure that sleeves and grease seals are in good order, and pack waterproof marine grease BEHIND the seals. Chains get a good soaking in light oil after every ride, and I regularly ease back the pads and check that the caliper slides on the pins to make sure all is well. To be honest I don't use brakes much offroad, so don't get through pads quickly at all, but do get into bogs and water--and having to replace wheel bearings etc is VERY rare for me--so whats the difference ?. On my WR250R--which has been in the dirt and water very regularly--I checked the bearings before my Bulgaria trip(and took spares but didn't need them)--and they are still fine. I must admit that every time a wheel comes out I either pop the seals and repack or at least spatula some grease up behind them--and there is never any sign of water or grit ingress--or rust--I don't wait until they fail. I think KTM have got it right with big diameter spindles(and hence bearings), and well thought out and robust grease seals--much better than just about everything else. I suppose that this maintenance is a little heavier than with a road bike but really doesn't take that long--the biggest issue is finding the energy and drive to do it after a long day on the trails-my bikes never go away dirty or needing maintenance--and I think it pays off--literally! Cleaning always forces you to give the bike the once over and spot any problems BEFORE they get serious. To sum up I think I'm helped by being gentle and slow--comes from being brought up on old British iron!

BlueUK
Posts: 52
Joined: Wed Jun 28, 2017 5:08 pm

Re: The mythical lowmaintenance trail bike.

Post by BlueUK » Tue Jul 04, 2017 10:31 am

garyboy wrote:I would have thought that a smaller lighter bike was less wearing.
My old TTR600 was great but seemed to fall apart gradually.
My CRF250L has not even been washed yet, and going well ... tho not had much use, admittedly.

more weight = more stress (machine and man)
The problem is the soil which is washed in with water is very coarse and acts like grinding paste.
Sludge behind the brake pads will leave them binding causing plenty of wear.
Lighter bikes should technically use a lighter chain and therefore the wear rate will be about the same but again a lot of variables.
If I'm riding through bogs, the drag on the wheels will be about the same so either way it needs riding out, I don't use brute force very often, it's usually the bike doing most of the work.

User avatar
garyboy
Posts: 2320
Joined: Thu Mar 07, 2013 6:14 pm
Location: Pontypridd
Has thanked: 866 times
Been thanked: 351 times

Re: The mythical lowmaintenance trail bike.

Post by garyboy » Tue Jul 04, 2017 11:00 am

Whichever way you look at it. more weight means more stress and strain on moving parts. which are similar whatever size bike. Also. a bigger bike is going to go faster between trails. and with more torque. which gives more opportunity for that wonderful grinding paste :)

Redmurty
Posts: 11651
Joined: Thu Oct 28, 2010 6:44 pm
Has thanked: 245 times
Been thanked: 112 times

Re: The mythical lowmaintenance trail bike.

Post by Redmurty » Tue Jul 04, 2017 1:04 pm

I have quickly come to the conclusion that everything are "consumables" including myself whilst off roading :pinch: :whistle:
my DR has certainly consumed some money since I've had it :side: and the term "what you looking at now" rings constantly in my ear :(
cheers Spud ;)
Life... it's not a dress rehearsal



You don't waste time... you waste yourself

Post Reply

Return to “TECHNICAL”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 97 guests